Journal of Information Sciences and Computing Technologies http://scitecresearch.com/journals/index.php/jisct Journal of information sciences and computing technologies en-US <p><strong>TRANSFER OF COPYRIGHT</strong></p> <p>JISCT is pleased to undertake the publication of your contribution to <strong>Journal of Information Sciences and Computing Technologies</strong></p> <p>The copyright to this article is transferred to JISCT(including without limitation, the right to publish the work in whole or in part in any and all forms of media, now or hereafter known) effective if and when the article is accepted for publication thus granting JISCT all rights for the work so that both parties may be protected from the consequences of unauthorized use.</p> jiscteditor@scitecresearch.com (Managing Editor) editorial@scitecresearch.com (JISCT Support Team) Fri, 16 Oct 2020 00:00:00 +0000 OJS 3.1.1.2 http://blogs.law.harvard.edu/tech/rss 60 Which One of Should and Had Better: A Corpora-based Analysis http://scitecresearch.com/journals/index.php/jisct/article/view/1942 <p>The ultimate goal of this paper is to provide a frequency analysis of <em>should</em> and <em>had better</em> within the Corpus of Contemporary American English, the British National Corpus, the Time Magazine Corpus, the Hansard Corpus, and the Corpus of Historical American English. The COCA clearly indicates that <em>should</em> may be the preferable type for Americans in eight genres, whereas <em>had better</em> may not. From the overall frequency of <em>should</em> and <em>had better</em>, it is clear that Americans tend to avoid <em>had better</em> since there is always a danger or problem if the hearer does not follow the advice. The BNC clearly shows that as in the case of the COCA, <em>should</em> is the preferable type for British people in seven genres. This may imply that the type <em>should</em> may be preferred over the type <em>had better</em> by British people. When it comes to the TMC, it is interesting to note that the type <em>should</em> was the preferable type for educated Americans. It is significant to note that the type <em>should</em> may have been the most preferred by educated Americans in the 2000s, but it may have been the most undesired type in the 1920s. With respect to the HC, it is worth noting that the type <em>should</em> was preferred by British politicians for 200 years from 1800 to 2000. From the overall frequency of <em>should</em> and <em>had better</em> in the HC, it is clear that the type <em>should</em> was preferred over the type <em>had better</em> by British politicians for 200 years. Finally, as for the COHA, it is noteworthy that the type <em>should</em> was preferred over the type <em>had better</em> by Americans from 1810 to 2000. The frequency of <em>should</em> reached a peak in 2000, but <em>should</em> had the lowest frequency in 1810. This in turn suggests that the type <em>should</em> was the most preferred by Americans in 2000, but it was the least preferred among Americans in 1810.</p> Nam-Kil Kang ##submission.copyrightStatement## http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0 http://scitecresearch.com/journals/index.php/jisct/article/view/1942 Fri, 16 Oct 2020 14:21:19 +0000